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The purpose of this page is to let you know what post spacing is typical for this type of fencing and our fence system. We will also provide some information on corner posts, end posts and bracing. 

This applies to all fence types: deer fence post spacing, dog fence post spacing, garden fence post spacing, cat fence post spacing and other animal fence post spacing.

If you are purchasing a complete fence kit, your fence kit will come with posts already (and the average applicable post spacing).

Note: Please use the below information as a guide rather than a rule. Ultimately, the customer decides how to best use our fence materials for their application. 

Note: (all values are plus or minus, can vary slightly either way - in general, the closer the post spacing the stronger your fence is)

Note: for the purpose of figuring out your post spacing, each access gate/drive gate/double drive gate is considered one post

Without tensioning:

650-700 poly fence: one post every 12 feet

800 poly fence: one post every 10-12 feet

1100-1400 poly fence: one post every 10 feet

metal fence (all variants): one post every 8 feet (or closer if located in areas with heavy snow and ice load)

With tensioning:

By tensioning, we are referring to the tension system used in our fence kits, consisting of loop format tension cable (either 12ga braided steel cable or 8ga monofilament) - one cable on top and one either at the bottom or towards the bottom. 

650-700 poly fence: one post every 15 feet

800 post fence: one post every 15 feet or less

1100-1400 poly fence: one post every 12 feet or less

metal fence (all variants): one post every 10 feet or less (or closer if located in areas with heavy snow and ice)

Note: Post spacing with tensioning (either poly or metal) usually also uses corner posts with bracing, end posts with bracing or angled braces/H braces (if applicable)

Corner Posts - End Posts - Braces

In general, customers that add tensioning also add support for the areas of their fence that change direction. The reason is, as you tension and pull on your cable to tighten it, the standard line posts will bend when enough force is applied to these angles.

General guidelines:

If you have tensioning with a poly fence or poly fence with a chew barrier, you should add corners and ends with bracing.

If you don't have tensioning with a poly fence or poly fence with chew barrier, most customers do not add tensioning. Some may instead opt for H braces or angled braces (can be added later, if necessary). 

If you have tensioning with a metal fence, you should add corners and ends with bracing. 

If you don't have tensioning with a metal fence, some customers add corners and ends with bracing also - in addition. This is because metal fence is very heavy and by itself can bend standard line posts with changes in direction. This is applicable and specifically applies to customers with dogs (dogs like to paw up on the fence, run into the fence, etc) and areas with snow and ice (snow and ice will accumulate and add weight). This can also apply to customers that are raising deer on a deer farm (building a fence to keep deer in). 

Notes on how to plan out your fence:

It's always best to draw out your fence on paper using dimensions and making an "X" where each post with go, corner post, end post, gate etc. Gates for post spacing purposes count as one post. 

You can then do this in the field when installing your fence: 

1) Pick up some flags (a few dollars at home depot/lowes for a bundle of 100) and count out one flag for each post, gate etc that you have in your fence kit or your order. For gates and corners you can write on the flag itself with a marker to identify it.

2) Place the flags using your fence drawing, one flag for every post, gate etc until the flags are gone. This will give you a visual idea of what your fence will look like and allow you to make adjustments. For example, on a long straight run you could extend post spacing slightly, or - in an area with a lot of direction changes, you could shorten post spacing. 

Hopefully we have given you some useful information above. Please review and as always give us a call or email with questions. 


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