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TICK CONTROL FENCE

Research has proven that wildlife exclusion fencing will reduce the number of ticks in an area up to 90% over time. Reduce the number of wild animals in an area and you will reduce the number of ticks in an area.

Why is this important? Ticks are dangerous because of the diseases they carry. Which is largely due to an increase in deer population and other factors. A main reason our customers choose to install our fence systems or fencing is specifically for the purpose of controlling ticks.

As dangerous as ticks are to humans, they are also hazardous to your pets. Dogs and cats are notorious for having embedded ticks in their fur that can then make their way into your home.

Resources and supporting information:

  • Ticks are increasingly becoming not only a big nuisance but a serious health risk. Ticks transmit Lyme disease and other diseases. Here's a link to the CDC page with direct information on Lyme Disease as well as quoted text with links from their website: Lyme disease - "Lyme disease is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi and is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected blacklegged ticks. Typical symptoms include fever, headache, fatigue, and a characteristic skin rash called erythema migrans. If left untreated, infection can spread to joints, the heart, and the nervous system. Lyme disease is diagnosed based on symptoms, physical findings (e.g., rash), and the possibility of exposure to infected ticks. Laboratory testing is helpful if used correctly and performed with validated methods. Most cases of Lyme disease can be treated successfully with a few weeks of antibiotics. Steps to prevent Lyme disease include using insect repellent, removing ticks promptly, applying pesticides, and reducing tick habitat. The ticks that transmit Lyme disease can occasionally transmit other tickborne diseases as well."
  • In the United States, some ticks carry pathogens that can cause human disease, including:

    • Anaplasmosis is transmitted to humans by tick bites primarily from the blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) in the northeastern and upper midwestern U.S. and the western blacklegged tick (Ixodes pacificus) along the Pacific coast.
    • Babesiosis is caused by microscopic parasites that infect red blood cells. Most human cases of babesiosis in the U.S. are caused by Babesia microti. Babesia microti is transmitted by the blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) and is found primarily in the northeast and upper midwest.
    • Borrelia mayonii infection has recently been described as a cause of illness in the upper midwestern United States. It has been found in blacklegged ticks (Ixodes scapularis) in Minnesota and Wisconsin. Borrelia mayonii is a new species and is the only species besides B. burgdorferi known to cause Lyme disease in North America.
    • Borrelia miyamotoi infection has recently been described as a cause of illness in the U.S. It is transmitted by the blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) and has a range similar to that of Lyme disease.
    • Colorado tick fever is caused by a virus transmitted by the Rocky Mountain wood tick (Dermacentor andersoni). It occurs in the the Rocky Mountain states at elevations of 4,000 to 10,500 feet.
    • Ehrlichiosis is transmitted to humans by the lone star tick (Ambylomma americanum), found primarily in the southcentral and eastern U.S.
    • Heartland virus infection has been identified in eight patients in Missouri and Tennessee as of March 2014. Studies suggest that Lone Star ticks may transmit the virus. It is unknown if the virus may be found in other areas of the U.S.
    • Lyme disease is transmitted by the blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) in the northeastern U.S. and upper midwestern U.S. and the western blacklegged tick (Ixodes pacificus) along the Pacific coast.
    • Borrelia mayonii infection has recently been described as a cause of illness in the upper midwestern United States. It has been found in blacklegged ticks (Ixodes scapularis) in Minnesota and Wisconsin. Borrelia mayonii is a new species and is the only species besides B. burgdorferi known to cause Lyme disease in North America.
    • Powassan disease is transmitted by the blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) and the groundhog tick (Ixodes cookei). Cases have been reported primarily from northeastern states and the Great Lakes region.
    • Rickettsia parkeri rickettsiosis is transmitted to humans by the Gulf Coast tick (Amblyomma maculatum).
    • Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is transmitted by the American dog tick (Dermacentor variabilis), Rocky Mountain wood tick (Dermacentor andersoni), and the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sangunineus) in the U.S. The brown dog tick and other tick species are associated with RMSF in Central and South America.
    • STARI (Southern tick-associated rash illness) is transmitted via bites from the lone star tick (Ambylomma americanum), found in the southeastern and eastern U.S.
    • Tickborne relapsing fever (TBRF) is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected soft ticks. TBRF has been reported in 15 states: Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Kansas, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Texas, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming and is associated with sleeping in rustic cabins and vacation homes.
    • Tularemia is transmitted to humans by the dog tick (Dermacentor variabilis), the wood tick (Dermacentor andersoni), and the lone star tick (Amblyomma americanum). Tularemia occurs throughout the U.S.
    • 364D rickettsiosis (Rickettsia phillipi, proposed) is transmitted to humans by the Pacific Coast tick (Dermacentor occidentalis ticks). This is a new disease that has been found in California.
  • Not sure if you're in an area susceptible to ticks and these diseases? This websitepage breaks down the type of ticks and their diseases geographically: CDC MAPS LINK - they also have great resource tabs to the left of this page which identify how to remove ticks and other tick related information
  • Here's research outlining use of a 7+ foot physical barrier fence to exclude deer. Their results show up to a 90% reduction in ticks over time, an effective tick control method. STUDY LINK. These results are similar to feedback and comments from our customers that have installed our fences. The before and after difference in tick density is like night and day. One customer complained she couldn't let her dog out anymore because she would come back so full of ticks; a year later she called saying she never sees any since our fence was installed. The before and after difference can be stark. Our main office and warehouse is based in Connecticut which is ground zero for Lyme disease (named after a shoreline town Lyme, CT). This is a very serious issue concerning our health and well being. To test the number of ticks in an area, try taking a large white sheet and placing it in a shady section of your yard. Pin down the edges so the sheet doesn't fly away and wait 48 hours. You can then count the number of ticks on the sheet (noticeable against the white background). Another way to measure tick density (like the research groups do) is to drag the white sheet through a set area over a set distance and measure the amount of ticks that cling to the sheet.
  • Another similar tick control study shows a 85% reduction. STUDY LINK - Note: they site using electric fence, we do not recommend or suggest using electric fence to exclude large wild animals. Electric fencing is great for farm animals that can be trained by shocking them once (they won't touch the fence again). Wild animals that run into an electric fence will probably not come back but will also have broken the single strand of wire, rendering your fence useless. Also, most fences to exclude deer are often in wooded areas where falling limbs and branches will also render your fence useless.
  • Non-pesticide tick control options are slim. Sometimes the pesticides used to treat an area for ticks can be as dangerous as tick borne diseases. We've installed many fences over the years in areas where there are many ticks. Sometimes, we unfortunately come back with them on us. One tip when working outside we learned from a customer at an installation on Nantucket is to tuck your pants into your socks if you can so they can't crawl up your pants. Spray repellent containing DEET on your clothes not your skin. DEET is bad for you if applied directly to the skin: HAZARDS OF DEET. We've also used lavender as a natural repellent. There is a good lavender scented deodorant made by Tom's of Maine that has helped as well (not found in many stores but available online).
  • -----Memorial Day SALE!
    -----Now through Tuesday 5/31:
    • ROLLS OF FENCING ARE ON SALE
    • GET FREE SHIPPING OVER $99
    • MULTIPLE FENCE ROLL BULK DISCOUNTS
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    Sale pricing will automatically expire at the end of the month Tuesday May 31st at Midnight